Hello World!

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Greetings and welcome to the SCBWI Westchester blog. Here you will find news and event recaps from our local chapter.

This is our kickoff month as an independent chapter. Previously part of the Metro NY chapter, we began hosting events in and around Westchester county in 2013.

Below you will find republished blog posts recapping some of our programming through the years.

We look forward to building our community and providing children’s book resources in the year to come. Happy 2018 to you all!

NICK BRUEL: HOW DID THE DOG FIND OUT?

Originally Published: November 2017

by Judy Shemtob

nick_bruel_wpNick Bruel, author and illustrator of the Bad Kitty picture book series, advised SCBWI-Westchester attendees to be curious, compassionate, and brave at his Nov. 4thworkshop, “The Three Things Necessary to Write a Story.” He treated participants to a Saturday afternoon of creating their own characters, cartoons, and stories as he brought out everyone’s creative self.

A master storyteller, Bruel used audience participation to share his process for inventing a story. He started with a title, asked the audience questions, and combined the details, actions, feelings, and emotions he received into an exciting story. The audience listened in awe as Bruel weaved their responses into his exciting story. “The more you ask yourself, the more interesting your story becomes,” said Bruel. Continue reading “NICK BRUEL: HOW DID THE DOG FIND OUT?”

FIRST PAGES WITH AGENT SABA SULAIMAN AND EDITOR KATE PROSSWIMMER

Originally Published: May 2017

By G. Myrthil

On Saturday, May 13, Saba Sulaiman, literary agent at Talcott Notch Literary, and Kate Prosswimmer, associate editor at Sourcebooks, teamed up to critique a dozen or so first pages, ranging from picture books to YA, chosen at random from audience members’ submissions. Saba and Kate were lucky—all the first pages were really strong. Yet they still had helpful feedback and advice to share. Continue reading “FIRST PAGES WITH AGENT SABA SULAIMAN AND EDITOR KATE PROSSWIMMER”

Scrivener For Beginners

Originally Published: February 2016

By K. Marcus

201601_scrivener05I think Ernest Hemingway would have liked Scrivener. He rewrote his manuscripts from the beginning, every day or if they were longer, once per week. And he did this all with pen and paper.

On Saturday, January 9, 2016, at SCBWI Metro NY’s On the Road workshop in Westchester, young adult writer and aspiring author, G. Myrthil, @gmyrthilbooks, taught us how to make that process go more smoothly with Scrivener, an organizational word-processing program designed by aspiring novelist, Keith Blount – a self affirmed geek. (To read more about him and find additional information on Scrivener go to https://www.literatureandlatte.com.)

Continue reading “Scrivener For Beginners”

THE ANATOMY OF A PICTURE BOOK

Originally Published: May 2014

by Ellen Raskin

THE ANATOMY OF A PICTURE BOOK was the title of Julia Sooy’s talk given on May 17, 2014, in Tarrytown. Her presentation was part of the traveling SCWBI Roadshow. Sooy, an Assistant to Laura Godwin, Acquiring Editor and Publisher at Henry Holt Books for Young Readers, explained details of the craft of the picture book.

She also shared her experience and knowledge of the practicalities of publishing picture books from the editorial stance, offering the theme “Picture Books by the Numbers”.

Following are important points she made. Continue reading “THE ANATOMY OF A PICTURE BOOK”

MAN ON WIRE: THE IMPORTANCE OF NARRATIVE TENSION

Originally posted: February 2014

By K. Marcus

seanmcarthyMAN ON WIRE, the documentary about Philippe Petit’s high-wire walk between the Twin Towers in 1974 was used by Sean McCarthy, owner of the Sean McCarthy Literary Agency, as a metaphor for planning and creating narrative tension in the manuscript.

McCarthy focused on the manuscript’s first three chapters as those are read by agents and editors. This was a presentation from the traveling SCBWI Roadshow in Tarrytown on February 8, 2014. Continue reading “MAN ON WIRE: THE IMPORTANCE OF NARRATIVE TENSION”